Amy Says Read This

Seriously, you should totally read this.


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Pretty Deadly by Kelly Sue DeConnick and Emma Rios

Image from Goodreads.com

Image from Goodreads.com

Pretty Deadly, vol. 1: The Shrike by Kelly Sue DeConnick and Emma Rios (ill.). (2014) Image Comics: ISBN: 9781607069621

Annotation: Young Sissy, the girl who wears a vulture’s skin, and blind Fox travel through the Western frontier making their living telling the story of Ginny, Death’s daughter, who rides the world doling out vengeance.

Reaction: I’m not sure why I never put two and two together before this, but, dang, do I love a graphic novel Western. Like, love. Adore. Wanna read them all. I love seeing different artists’ interpretations of my native land (I’m a desert girl, through and through), I love reading how authors incorporate the history and legends of a place into a new creation, and I absolutely adore cowboy iconography. Give me a good cowboy character in a story, and you pretty much have me, hook, line and sinker. So for that alone, this book was really going to appeal to me, and add in a woman writing team and a few kickass lady characters, and this book would have to actually legit suck for me to hate it. It doesn’t suck. I loved it. I wanted to eat it up and cuddle with it and linger over it.

I think DeConnick has written a really solid origin story with this volume, and I enjoyed the way Ginny’s mythology and Sissy’s life entwined. This was a great way to introduce a bunch of characters, who I hope will turn up again in future volumes, and to set up any future adventures Ginny has. I loved that the ladies really took the lead in this story, and except for blind Fox, the men pretty much took a backseat to the women. And while I hesitate to call this a multicultural title, DeConnick does give a pretty meaningful role to Sarah (is that her name? I don’t have the book in front of me and nothing I’ve found on The Internet mentions her), Fox’s black lady-friend, who also happens to be a total badass. I hope future volumes include even more diverse characters.

The art in this is also fantastic. Rios does a great job bringing the desert to life and Jordie Bellaire’s colors (another lady on this team, woot!) are crazy good. All the art is lush and detailed and really helps draw you into the story, and I found the team’s use of panels (lots of small panels indicating rapid movement and long narrow ones to pick out pivotal moments) really propels you through the many action sequences. My only complaint is that Rios (or someone) is a huge fan of the EXTREME CLOSEUP, and I feel like at least once very two page spread there was a panel or two drawn really close into whatever’s happening. Unfortunately, it almost starts to feel like one of those “Do You Know What This Is?” games where stuff is really highly magnified and looks completely alien; most of the time I could not tell what was happening in those close up panels. Thankfully, the surrounding panels usually did a good job of giving me an idea of what was happening, but it was off-putting and pulled me out of the story every time it happened.

Overall, this was a great read, and I’m definitely looking forward to what comes next. I also think it would be really interesting to compare this Western to another Western from Image East of West, which also uses Death as a character. This is a book I would give to adults or older teens who love Westerns, fantasy or strong heroines. (I wish more people would ask me for graphic novel recommendations; there are SO MANY goods ones out right now!)

Author’s website

Illustrator’s Flickr

(Contributed to Cannonball Reads 7 as part of my 52 reviews in 52 weeks.)

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Ms. Marvel by G. Willow Wilson & Adrian Alphona

Image from Goodreads.com

Image from Goodreads.com

Wilson, G. W., & Alphona, A. (ill.). 2014. Ms. Marvel, vol. 1: No normal. New York: Marvel. ISBN: 9780785190219

Annotation: Kamala Khan is a Muslim-American teen living in Jersey City, who, caught in a mysterious fog blanketing the city, wishes to become like her hero, Carol Danvers aka Captain Marvel.

Reaction: This book is amazing. Seriously. So good. I’m not sure how this book got published, like who at Marvel thought a series about a Muslim-American Ms. Marvel was a good idea? Because that person deserves a raise. I’m so glad they took a chance on this. This is exactly the kind of thing we need to see more of in comics: strong female characters, great diversity, good writing and art. I am definitely going to start following this series (should I stick with trades or get individual subscriptions?) I want Kamala to be my new best friend or my little sister. She’s totally, delightfully clueless in the way of all sixteen year olds, and she’s such a normal American teen, except, you know, with super powers, which I think is such a positive message to be promoting in comics today, especially from one of the big publishers.

I especially love all the identity stuff they have her dealing with in this first volume. She’s a normal girl, except the people around her won’t let her forget that she is different, but she just wants to be normal, dangit. But at the same time, the idea of abandoning her beliefs and her heritage are not something she even considers. She might have issues with her local sheikh but not with her religion.

The art is also really fantastic in this book. Alphona does a great job of making her look like a 16 year old Muslim-American girl. I love that she doesn’t just look like a slightly younger, slightly browner version of Carol Danvers (and every other woman in superhero comics [though she does have super awesome hair]). She is distinct without being charicaturized, and I love that the art doesn’t have that high gloss, super polished sheen of other major superhero titles. It has a younger vibe to it, without the art being dumbed down.

All in all, I think this book is great, and I think everyone should read if only for the super awesome feminist, non-white perspective.

Author website

Illustrator website

(Contributed to Cannonball Reads 7 as part of my 52 reviews in 52 weeks.)